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BEST IDE C++ light?

Discussion in 'HW Helpdesk' started by FraudBreed, Oct 4, 2017.

  1. Fr

    FraudBreed Registered User

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    Ideally lightweight
     
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  2. lonewolf000

    lonewolf000 Registered User

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    code blocks?

    Code:
    http://www.codeblocks.org/
     
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  3. pr

    programdelphi Registered User

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  4. Gi

    Gitter Registered User

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    What features are you looking for in an IDE?

    The sad truth is that, when it comes to C++ and you're looking a fully-featured solution, you are kind of stuck with Microsoft Visual Studio on Windows, or KDevelop on Linux. It really comes down to what you are willing to give up. Personally, I was never happy with any IDE out there for one reason or another. For the most part, I am writing non-GUI applications with custom make files and my biggest gripe was auto-complete never truly working. I eventually gave up and started using a plain editor instead (UltraEdit in my case).

    If you're looking for something bare-bones, maybe check out UEStudio. Its development used to lag behind UltraEdit but they since closed that gap. If memory serves me right, UEStudio does not have any facilities to help with GUI applications though.

    The one programdelphi recommended, on the other hand, should be VERY good for GUI applications, considering it uses the Borland/Inprise Delphi foundation. A downside would be their compilers, which aren't exactly known for good optimization and you cannot deviate from them last time I checked. The size cannot exactly be considered lightweight either.

    Code::Blocks is likely as lightweight as it gets while still having all the features one might want.

    Another one sometimes used in academia would be LCC. Even more lightweight, but the wedit-IDE is riddled with severe bugs that cause crashes all the time and the way the editor works is very counter-intuitive.

    Eclipse is not exactly lightweight either, but provides everything you might need. Its downside is that it suffers from issues with auto-complete. Once files get a little bigger (even if you remove the conservative memory limits that the auto-complete feature may use), it will start showing you errors all over the code. You might get it to work correctly temporarily, but it will revert to a non-working state in no time.

    Jetbrains CLion and Dev-C++ might be worth looking into as well.
     
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  5. bw

    bwgabo Registered User

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    I use Macs and Linux pretty much exclusively. For straight C++ projects I've found CLion to be an excellent IDE. The pros: it is really fast, works the same on Mac/Linux/Windows, has the best emacs keybinding emulation of any IDE, great git integration, and does all the project's heavy lifting very easily. Pretty much my favourite IDE. The drawbacks: it requires the use of CMake (pretty much the standard these days). the debugger UI is a bit clunky at times (although it makes working with GDB effortless), and it simply stopped working immediately the license expired (no "keep using the old version" option).

    For Mac development the goto choice is Xcode. It simply is the premier tool in that ecosystem but if you aren't targetting Macs then running CLion is the way to go.
     
  6. pitoloko

    pitoloko Registered User

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    Visual Studio Code is a lightweight source-code editor (with many features from a professional dedicated IDE) that works on various operating systems.


    https://code.visualstudio.com/

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    Microsoft is always the way to go for programming.
     
  7. userzim

    userzim Registered User

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    I'm not a huge fanboy of any IDE but...
    I use VIM when I'm in the shell with some help from the following plugins:


    VI/M is nice because it's super lightweight and it can function as a fully equipped IDE.

    If I'm not SSH'd into the development environment and I'm doing work on Windows. I will use Sublime Text (or atom) and then run MinGW for a debugger. I find that most of the larger IDEs - Netbeans, Eclipse, and Visual Studio, are too heavyweight and bogged down in features for me. Visual Studio Code is an exception and is pretty lightweight.

    For me, some of the IDEs mask the functionality that one can learn while setting up their editors and tools manually. Lastly, try to use source control for your projects, an editor isn't needed but most will have plugins.
     

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