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SSD Drives what is better?

Discussion in 'HW Helpdesk' started by RubberDuck, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. Jen Smith

    Jen Smith is a Trusted Warez PosterJen Smith Honorary Member Honorary Member V.I.P DEV Guild

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    Like I mentioned before I have zero experience with XP and SSD's myself, just going by what I read when I was doing research before buying... I have one XP system left in the house, an old Samsung Q1 "tablet" that can't be upgraded. (No drivers, never mind it's an 800 MHz Celeron with 512MB... a paperweight that barely runs XP.)

    Anyway, from what I understand, it does work, but it can be detrimental to the life of the SSD because without TRIM support there's a lot more write cycles going on in the drive than necessary. And with XP not doing a proper partition alignment, the drive won't be as fast as it could be. You probably got a disc with your SSD that contains software for it, depending on who made it, chances are there's a TRIM utility included with that.

    Copy/pasting a random article which may explain it better than I can:

    Windows 7, 8 and current Linux distros will take this into account when creating partitions, XP does not as I understand it.

    Less writes means more life for an SSD. If this is just a storage drive that doesn't get written to that often it's probably not that big a deal, definitely want it for a system drive though as that's constantly being written to.

    It does work with XP, just some special precautions need to be taken into account. My previous comments were directed at new installs, not upgrading existing systems that doesn't require a reinstall. Totally worth it as a system drive though, my Windows 7 system is at the desktop waiting for me in ~18 seconds from a cold start, Windows 8's a tad faster still. Visual Studio 2012 from a cold start in under 5 seconds, instant after that.. older versions like 2008 would probably be near instant cold. Best upgrade ever.
     
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  2. men240

    men240 is a Trusted Warez Postermen240 V.I.P. User V.I.P DEV Guild

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    Thanks for the info.

    Base on the above chart, what are the total lifespan estimation for slc ssds then?:confused:
     
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  3. Jen Smith

    Jen Smith is a Trusted Warez PosterJen Smith Honorary Member Honorary Member V.I.P DEV Guild

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    Well, depends on who made it of course. For that chart above, they used an 840 Pro for the MLC drive. (It's in the article itself, not on the chart.) That particular drive has an "endurance rating" of 272,420 gigabytes, not sure how they calculated that number, Samsung as far as I know didn't release a figure.

    The Intel 710 claims an endurance rating of about 3.0 petabytes, which is around 3,145,728 gigabytes if my math is right. (Which can be questionable....) I'm quickly running out of fingers to do this sort of math, but I'd guess decades of life with that "consumer average" of 10GB written per day usage. They also claim a MTBF of 2 million hours. For $1500+ it better last a long time lol.

    Here's another article with mind-numbing math. This guy calculates an SLC's life span under constant non-stop writing of 6GB per second. The results seem to be between 1.5 years (32GB drive) to 11.8 years (256GB drive.) Again, that's not-stop writing at a full 6GB/s, which is an unrealistic number to begin with. Stretch that out to 10GB/day. Math isn't my thing but that's a pretty long time. Any math experts here? I got a nosebleed just reading that article.
    Code:
    http://ef.gy/statistics:ssd-write-endurance
     
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  4. men240

    men240 is a Trusted Warez Postermen240 V.I.P. User V.I.P DEV Guild

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    Ever heard about diskless boot?;)


    This one isnt free. Maybe need find some crack...
    Code:
    http://www.ccboot.com/features.htm
    But this one below is free.
    Code:
    http://windowsdisklessaoe.wordpress.com/
    This is one technology which might really stretch up to 6Gb/s write(for the thing called write back cache, I still havent really figure out whats what yet). I was reading the FAQ on ccboot website.

    I saw a demo before(one or two years ago at a preview my friend bring me along), it was awesome until I also saw some clients got BSOD too.:p That demo was using linux(which I hate since I wasnt familiar with linux at all).

    I read somewhere some schools also use this diskless technology somewhere in my country.
     
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  5. cr

    crackfan Registered User

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    use ssdlife opt
     
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  6. in

    invarbrass Guest

    This is not a new technology. CCboot is an implementation of PXE boot client & server on Windows. PXE booting has been available in pretty much all Linux/Unix distros for several decades. IIRC, Windows Deployment Services (WDS) has been available since Server 2003 and it has somewhat limited support for PXE.

    Here's another freeware PXE server:
    Code:
    http://www.vercot.com/~serva/
    If you want to do it manually, you'll need to run TFTP and DHCP server on the server machine. Check out these SO resources:
    Code:
    http://superuser.com/questions/570130/how-to-setup-a-pxe-boot-server
    http://superuser.com/questions/42263/how-to-install-windows-7-from-the-network
     
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  7. en

    enteraja Registered User

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    My choise is
    Don't buy m2 ssd size. Because tools for recovery less than 2.5inch ssd
     
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  8. kirk56k

    kirk56k Registered User

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    That would be a terrible sugestion. SATA3 (the latest and fastest SATA specification) only supports up to 600MB/s theoretical maximum speed. Most SATA SSD's max out around 520-530MB/s. While an NVMe M.2 SSD on the other hand has 4-8 GB/s depending on PCIe generation and NVMe version. You can easily find NVMe drives that support up to 3GB/s read and 2GB/s write. Not to mention the advantages that NVMe protocol itself carries over the SATA protocol. As for recovery, I generally use a standard PCIe slot to M.2 NVMe adapter board to mount NVMe drives in my workbench machine for recovery. I have three of said cards in this machine aside from its regular boot SSD which is mounted on the motherboard. Recovery M.2 SSD's is no more difficult than regular SSDs.
     
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  9. en

    enteraja Registered User

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    i agree Recovery M.2 SSD's is no more difficult than regular SSDs.
    no converter m2 to regular ssd too
     
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